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down. we have to take care of our environment. we need a rich canopy of trees in the city" and this what is means to so many people, and he was one of strong voice bs our environment. he has been known for that and in the years of 2000 he took up the college trustee on the board. many of you know in the past years he was passionate about his work at city college. he knew, and again we had the opportunity to share what we got out of college and what so many generations of youth would want and desire in our city college. he was leading the effort in my opinion to restore and to elevate the level of integrity and transparency at our city college. he demanded that of the other trustees as well as the administration . he went through some hard times as a trustee and shared with members here of the difficult years when things weren't as transparent as they should have been and integrity wasn't at the top of someone's mindful priorities but this is something he stood for. this is something him and his family stood for. as i know carolyn and her work on the status of woman an
that enhances environment. indoor air quality, energy, water, materials and resources, and sustainable sites are the five categories for the lead. you can go for several gold or platinum certifications. >> the city wanted to be silver lead status. . maybe gold was a stretch. and people said, if we're going to be a sustainable organization that the pucs this has got to be the top of the line. it's got to be a lead platinum building. what does that mean to us? we run water, power, and sewer. so, those are some of the biggest things involved in lead platinum. ♪ ♪ >> by late 2008 the project, as we got the contractor on board and we were able to start pricing it, we're a multi-, multi-, multi-million dollar over budget. >> the story a lot of people don't know after we got select today do this project, the first price we came in with was $180 million. and the city said, you know, this is a great building, but we just don't want to spend that much money. so, the project was on the verge of being canceled. >> if you're looking at why this building came to be, in many ways it also included mayor
of our schools. they're not military encampments. they're safe environments in which the children feel very secure around with that kind of protection. you think about, in your country, england has an armed presence for international flights going in and out of england in a very sensitive environment called an airplane. post-9/11, people said guns have no place in the cockpit or in the passenger planes. but in fact, they have worked very well because they're trained. >> actually, let me pick you up on that. what's been effective on planes is an outright ban on any weapons, any guns. that's what's been effective. the reason you dont see people using guns on planes is they have been banned. this brings me to the point of what i have been trying to get to on this show, which is it's not about removing everybody's guns in america. it's a complete fallacy when people spin out that line. it's designed, i think, to instill the kind of fear president obama talked about today. trying to make people think, oh, my god, they're coming for my gun. and what happens is a lot of americans buy more of
. learn about it. it will save our environment by using a viable renewable resource it will create jobs for millions of californians. it will be reforest our trees, seal, expunge, destroy any felony, misemeanor, present or prior. it will allow those 21 and over responsible adults to use cannabis responsibly like they do in other nations. it will tax the recreation industry like tomatoes and the money will go to the social infrastructure. we will go nationwide with this. plan ongoing worldwide with this. we will end the war on cannabis. using a medicine that comes from god, genesis 2:9, crack open your bibles. san francisco is a city of love. congratulations. it is the interest of my life work since 1976. god bless you all. >> next speaker. >> president chiu, supervisors, elected officials and public. i stand to be in a great deal of excitement because within our african-american tradition we are celebrating the 150th anniversary of the emancipation proclamation. i congratulate those who have been elected on this most auspicious occasion. i want to say that i think it is very good
people to get around in a way that steps lightly on the environment. we want people to get around in ways that are enjoyable. and that really contribute to what makes san francisco special, such as our wonderful cable cars. but above all, we want to make sure that people can get around the city safely. it's no good to have a great transportation system if people can't get around safely. people need to not only be able to be safe, but to be able to feel safe, and nowhere is that more important than when you're on foot because that is when you're arguably the most vulnerable. it's also how every trip starts and ends. and many trips in san francisco, and we want more of them in between, to be on foot as well because it's a nicer way to enjoy the city. but if we want people to be out and walking, we need them to be safe. we want them to feel safe, and that's what we're here to talk about today. and none of that will happen without great leadership. so, without further ado, happy to bring up our great leader, the mayor of the city and county, ed lee. (applause) >> thank you. thank you, david.
not communicate with the officers. they are in a precarious situation. they worked at a much closer environment and they cannot be perceived as a snitch. or that they are working with the police department. they are there to, down, emotionally, the anchor. what they do then, we have a shooting war homicide. and they go to the hospital to be with the families. any talk of retaliation -- they will work with our social workers at the hospital. and whether the retaliation must go next. to saturate and prevent and interrupt any violence that may occur. this is a component or peace that has been building. i polled the captains of payview, mission, ingleside and the northern district. these are the most affected by gang violence. they said they appreciated what the crn did what they want to see them more. they need to fill that communication. it also comes down to training and trust, to be able to have them talk to officers. they would address the officers, they had arrested some of them, when there were actually under. they will help the police and the community. under his guidance we are the most ac
about that. since that time the department of the environment sent additional documentation where they have broken out what additional work they do above and beyond the 6 billion dollars in direct subsidy. they show that about 1.4 goes in the benchmarking and outreach, scheduling visits, site surveys, following up with contractors. at this point in comfortable with supporting this item. i wanted to share with the board some of the conversation that has happened and it is a good item to look for in any grant, how much of the direct overhead we are charging versus what goes out to businesses. in the situation in particular around energy efficiency just being able, to reach around businesses is an important thing and do it in the language and the effort to share with people what they can do to help. i am going to support this item and wanted to share the data presented by doe. >> can we take this item, same house and call? without objection this ordinance is passed in the first reading. item 17. >> same house same call. this resolution is adopted. item 18. >> president: same house sa
artificially changed the environment to monitor the impact on the crustaceans. they're trying to find out if the thinning of the ice could affect krill numbers. bigger animals at the south pole provide even more data. scientists in the university of tasmania have attached small devices on elephant seals to record their movements and the temperature of the sea where they swim. they're aiming to determine how changes in the ice volume and water temperature affect behavior. >> the elephant seal numbers have been declining over the last 20 or 30 years, and it's almost certainly due to some change in the marine environment. we can make predictions about how the animals are going to respond as the climate changes into the future. >> reporter: australian officials and experts say their effort isn't just academic but realistic and practical too. >> certainly climate change is a really big concern to us. concerned about antarctica because of the impact it has and the practical consequences. it affects the ocean around it and therefore the fisheries upon which we rely. >> reporter: some of these st
the bidding environment for our contractors. it's remarkable what she has done. >> been a public service -- being a public servant is a good thing. i love my job. i would never exchange it for anything else in the world. [applause] [applause] >> i am from the department of public works. i have the honor of introducing jocelyn quintos. i will just a real quick, jocelyn works very hard. through her work, a lot of contracts and a lot of work that she does -- she has brought new systems that have saved a lot of tand time and allowed us to give contracts and make payments very fast. please meet jocelyn. [applause] >> first of all, i just want to thank spur and mfac for giving me this honor. i've never really won an award. it does feel like you won the oscars. it's different when you are standing here. i do not even have a written speech. i will speak from the heart. today is a very important day for me and my family because this happens to be my father's death anniversary. i want to dedicate this to my father. my mom flew in tonight. my brother, who works for bart. [applause] i have my nephew
that if they really want to create value and send their stocks higher, the best way to do that in this environment may be simply to buy another company. hence, the huge spike in m and a activity in the fourth quarter. i think it's big. this trend continues in 2013, if you ask me. but i don't want just to see more deals. i want them to be the right deals. buy, buy, buy. so for all of the lonely is ceos who i'm sure are sitting on the rooftops singing. ♪ matchmaker make me a match ♪ find me a match make me a perfect match so you can sing, yes i am a rich man to a very plaintive tune. the hottest theme out there, a steaming hot thing, housing. these two combined, business will be an absolute powerhouse. i'm talking about masco and fortune brands home and security. two makers of cabinets, plumbing fixtures and other housing-related products. masco is the largest non commodity supplier to home depot and i should point out that any deal to acquire fortune brands would have to be done later in the year because of arcane tax laws. that's the caveat. still, the timing. we are now witnessing a fabulous hous
is to foster an environment where sexual assault is not tolerated, condoned or ignored. we must have a climate of dignity and respect with where where a victim's report is taken seriously x they're provided resources. commanders or and leaders across the armed forces play an essential role in establishing this climate where victims supported, and they do not fear retaliation, where offenders know they will be found and held accountable and where bystanders are motivated to intervene. our troops take care of each other on the battlefield, the same ethos of care must extend to combating sexual assault. commanders are responsible for the good order and discipline of the forces under them. this is essential to military readiness and mission success. removing commanders from the administration of military justice would undercut their ability to establish good order and discipline in their units and undercut their authority especially in combat where the uniform code of military justice is most tested by the stresses of war. the department has undertaken a variety of initiatives to strengthen our ef
of our preferences or the inability to control our preferences. we are victims of our environments growing up. we are victims of our context that we live in and, therefore, we all, you know, are not "responsible for that behavior and therefore should be mitigating." when you look at the testimony that comes in, whether it's from a mother or from neighbors or from teachers that are talking about really mitigating circumstances, they are the rotten social background kind of arguments, the abuse and the suffering that that individual experienced and those things show up in the brain. the brain is also a sponge. the brain isn't simply created by genetics and it's very much shaped by environment. and so my mentor john monaghan likened the problem of predicting violent people to predicting violent storms. when you think of meteorology, you think of the difficulty of classifying a hurricane and tracking a hurricane, making judgments about such complex behavior that has sort of chaotic premises underlying it, you're going to make lots of mistakes. you're going to make lots of mistakes in b
as part of their living environment, but see progress going forward. this is the promise of hope sf. this is personally what i recognize, what gavin started with his -- with the board of supervisors and make a big promise. but i get the lucky opportunity to see it through. i get to see the smiles of the people that are moving in and see their hopes continued. and again, it's the first of three phases for this project, but we have plans for alice griffith, for sunnydale, for potrero hill, for west side courts, every one of these will be touched. (applause) >> not just with their own money. we're going to see to it that our private partners, too, whether it's benny house or the sf foundation, the san francisco foundation that we are working very closely with already. they're helping me raise many of the private funds that go into the training services in support of services. and, of course, even our own staff at the mayor's office of housing at the cii. we're all buoyed by this. we all know at the end of it it's such a goal for everybody to have decent living lives and environment. th
for the environment; i am proud of the fact that we are on the cutting edge but together we should do better. we have a hard-working ethics commission and san franciscans have repeatedly worked for ethics reform; we need to make sure that the laws are enforced and the public is no question our transparency. now, in any legislature is easy to think of ourselves as rivals, as part of one faction or another. today was different about this board of supervisors is that there are more of us who do not think that the rigid labels of yesterday help. no one outside the city sees the differences between us, and there are endless opportunities for each of us to lead. a few months ago our beloved san francisco giants won the world series again. (applause) and they did it because every single member of the team showed up every day, played to the strengths, work together as a team, and took turns making the big plays. whether it supervisor mar, or supervisor farrell addressing looming costs, supervisor breed getting the jobs that young adults need, supervisor kim making sure all kids graduate, supervi
. those are parts of my dna. other things that people are not aware of, i do care about health environment in san francisco. i want to make sure that we have enough health facilities to serve all san francisco, not just one part of the city. i want to make sure that our small businesses are supported. why? i come from a family where we had a small grocery store. i understand what it means to run a small business. maybe people think about 500 people is a small business. i'm talking about businesses that drive neighborhoods, support neighborhoods, give jobs to people in those neighborhoods. i want to work with others on the board of supervisors to improve the conditions support them , and make them thrive. those are some of the things, education, the economy. now that we are through the downturn, and dealt with the cuts, we want to make sure that is we improve the economy that we put ourselves in a better position to deal with these issues in the future so that people who depend on the safety net don't lose it. what i saw is, there were a lot of people suffering out there, and lo
and quiet environment and you might see butter nice, and dandelion and is squirrels hundred dollaring for their next meal and buena vista park is 88 . >> golden gate parks largest body of water ska great labor for scrolling and picnicking and both miking which can both be rented at the boat house and the lakewood design for leisure boatings and carriages and a treasure trove passing hunting ton water falls two bridges connect the strawberry island and inclient to the hills the highest upon the in golden gate park and more than free hundred feet and you can catch glimpses will from the city at the top of a romantic look out and for >> hey, guys, known a with the weekly. much to do and much to see. here the top activities at the top of my list. this tuesday, january 15th, the sf main library will feature free film night and reception and celebrate 2013.
and hostile environment, we survived. starting in the 80s with just 25 students started as the first chinese public school opened in san francisco in 1985. as i remember, i remember the quote, which would you teach chinese to them? i try to recall that and to what my colleague said has grown from a small pocket of multi-ethnic students to a student body comprised of many diverse socioeconomic backgrounds. i try to recall how hard we fought, administrator and parents and students and teachers alike. and what we each sacrificed to be be where -- to be where we are today. today i am humbled by my students who excel in two languages and our students are asked to demonstrate their chinese skills. today our graduates go to beijing, china to build bridges using their skills. today educators can answer the question, why teach chinese to them? by simply responding, why not. i share this very prestigious bell award proudly with my students and my staff. because they are the ones helping me make my dream come true every single day. above all, i remain grateful for the opportunity to do the work that i
that we have a safe environment to learn. and they make us feel comfortable and safe to share our feelings. i enjoy math and science, because the teachers teach us in chinese. and they teach us step by step. i am proud to be a student at alice fong yu. thank you. [speaking foreign language] [applause] >> hello, everyone, i am maze. i a seventh grader at alice fong yu, and i am peer mediator. afy is an amazing school. the chinese i learned there has been helpful in so many situations. if not for me being able to speak chinese, i would not be able to communicate with people that can only speak chinese. and it will definitely help me in the later years. i am so happy that alice fong yu has the national blue ribbon award. it definitely deserves it. [applause] [speaking chinese] [applause] >> good evening, i am may, i was born in raised here in san francisco, and i live in bay-view hunter's point. i am an eighth grader attending ali alice fong yu, we are given a great experience to learn chinese. in my grade we have seven subjects, math, social studies and candnies -- cantonese and mandarin. th
the important things, they are all from pretty average environments. extremely different in terms of structure. does this go towards mitigation? how should it be used? how should this information be used to? i use it to dole out treatment. that is how i thought we would kick start this seminar. i am happy to answer any other questions. i did not do this all by myself. i had a lot of individuals who helped me with this data. this research is all funded by the national research of health, your tax dollars. thank you for your attention. i will turn over to our moderator. thank you. [applause] >> actually, i would like to, i'm going to ask a few questions, but i was hoping we could get a debate going here rather than with me trying to ask intelligent questions and just have the very smart people just talking amongst themselves to educate us. so one of the questions that we're wanting to talk about today was the idea of free will in terms of the criminal justice system. and i would like to ask each of you, is there a definition of free will in the context of your individual work? we'll start with y
professionals who are called substitutes and provide a safe learning environment for our students. they fill in for teachers and administrators and enable our district to continue to function. thank you. >> yes, good evening, i am james mccanada, i am a substitute teacher. i am here as a last resort. to prevent the repeat of a substitute staffing problem. that has negatively affected our district elementary school students and middle school for the last four months. board members should have received my e-mail days ago. there has been a slight change, that i will elaborate on in a moment. this has several consequences that are preventible. due to the substitute system failing to provide information. students and schools have suffered needlessly in many ways. first students often receive improper substitutes. and substitutes occasionally unknowing accepted 6-12 assignments. a substitute was attacked with a chair with in a classroom that she believed to be younger schools. she never accepts middle school assignments. this created a truly untangible situation. yesterday grade level information
more driver distraction than already exists of a complex work environment of a taxi cab? what about the fare? we know that uber always charges more than the meters fare. however, their transactions are totally invisible to us. i am running out of time, so i will just say you should not turn a blind eye to these services. they undermine our services and we ask you to adopt emergency regulations to prohibit that kind of activity. >> thank you. >> can i ask a question? >> sorry to turn this into school day for you charles. are you suggesting to us that luxor cabs are responding to uber calls? so a luxor cab dealing with flagged calls or dispatched calls? >> yes. >> so they might get uber or luxor? you don't have the ability to control your drivers to tell them they can't do that? >> that is a good question, director. >> we probably shouldn't be discussing that. to miss hale, when director reiskin was speaking about ideas, i think while we certainly heard everything that miss hale said, i wouldn't want anybody watching this to get the wrong idea of what has been proposed. >> th
year despite a weaker environment, and that has given exports a boost. >> exports are the backbone of the german economy. they continued to grow last year, albeit at a slower rate. companies are proceeding with caution. they are cutting investment amid uncertainty about what the new year will hold, especially for the eurozone. in 2011, the german economy grew by 3%. that figure dropped to 0.7% last year. the economy even contracted in the final quarter. the government is poised to cut its own forecast for 2013 to just 0.5%. that is unlikely to have an immediate impact on the jobs market. the unemployment rate is expected to see just a small rise this year. >> for, let's cross over to a frankfurt -- to frankfurt. not necessarily the greatest news for those without a job, but there was good news for the german tax man. >> absolutely. the government has been able to reach its budget plans earlier than expected. the new debt load has been lower than expected, and this has been very good news, although the government also lowered its forecast for the economy, but here at the financial m
creates a welcoming environment for everybody. there is no cultural barrier to entry. >> the demographic of people who come will match the demographic of the reader. it is very simple. if we want more people of color, you book more people of color. you want more women, your book more women. kind of like that. it gets mixed up a little bit. in general, we kind of have a core group of people who come every month. their ages and very. we definitely have some folks who are straight. >> the loyal audience has allowed michelle to take more chances with the monthly lineup. established authors bring in an older audience. younker authors bring in their friends from the community who might be bringing in an older author. >> raider has provided a stage for more than 400 writers. it ranges from fiction to academics stories to academic stories this service the underground of queer fell, history, or culture. >> and there are so many different literary circles in san francisco. i have been programming this reading series for nine years. and i still have a huge list on my computer of people i need to ca
with community based organizations and programs like environment now to target 20,000 households. we expect that we will actually reach and have direct conversations with 5400 households and that means we're looking at being 99% confident of the results of this survey with a not more than 2% margin for error or deviation from that. this will include distribution of postcards and other materials at community events and festivals across the city as well as this door to door "hi we're the cleanpower sf program and we want to talk about our offering". we're also going to -- in recognition of the fact some folks have called us and said "hey we're hearing about this program and we're interested". we're going to allow some commercial customers that seem to be expressing more than of an environmental consciousness based interest in our program to sort of cue up and be participants in this program, so we our -- our prime area focus is residential but we will let commercial customer who is are interested be part of the program and make sure that we hear from them and right size the program commitmen
-start cartilage growth. >> it really helps the cartilage, the new cartilage grow by providing an environment where the cartilage feels comfortable and feels like they can produce actual cartilage instead of scar tissue. >> dr. larry gold studied a small group of patients with damaged cartilage. most of them tried the new hydro gel. patients still had to undergo an outpatient procedure allowing tiny holes to be drilled in their bone beneath the cartilage. the hydro gel was applied. as a result healthy cartilage grows instead of scar cartilage. >> you have a repair that is more like the native cartilage. it will last longer. it will perfeorm better, the patient will be able to tolerate more weight bearing activity without pain. >> reporter: because the cartilage can last five years instead of one or two with the current approach, the new procedure may spare patients from undergoing a second cartilage repair or knee replacement surgery. larger studies are now need ed o determine if hydro gel is safe long term and if it is, it could be available to patients in just a few years. the fda must also appro
events this morning. the council for science and the environment discusses disasters in the environment. the discussion will focus on the lessons of hurricane katrina, the ongoing drought, and the earthquake in japan. that is on c-span3 at 8:30 on with -- , today's a few moments headlines and phone calls, live on washington journal. the us house of representatives will be in session at two o'clock eastern. a disaster aid spending bill for hurricane sandy. in 45 minutes, we will be joined by scott rigell of virginia. we will talk about his recent we will talk about his recent letter to
was fantastic. this is all about creating an environment where businesses can grow, especially led by manufacturing, and we're going to be exporting the explorer from chicago because of what we've done to improve our competitors in the united states to 94 countries around the world so there's no reason that we can't do this in the united states if we have a laser focus on creating an environment where businesses can grow. liz: good news. as you look over the right shoulder at the sparkly grill, that atlas is something. you know, i look at concept cars, though, alan, as a unicorn. you see them once at auto shows, and then they never really materialize on dealership floors. will we see that car behind you? that truck in some form at dealerships in the future? >> yes, and to your point, liz, the neatest thing over the last six years, we, on every concept car we have had, we wanted to communicate where that design, where that capability was going and where we were taking it so there are concept cars, but they have a clear indication of where we are going to be improving the vehicle. to
, what do we do to create an environment where businesses can grow and we can expand economic development? because this is still a very, very fragile expansion, though it is a expansion from probably the deepest recession we've ever been in wince the depression. a lot of pent-up demand, so i think this debate is centered on the right thing, what do we do to create an environment where businesses can grow. >> if we need and if republicans argue that what needs to be done is to cut the deficit, they need to perhaps go into default, are you okay with that? ivities illustrates well again i think we need to look at that time it through the lens of economy development. anything to slow this expansion down would have very, very serious consequences to all of us. >> let me ask you about your announcement last week. you were going to hire engineers, computer programmers. last year you announced to add 12,000 jobs by 2015. given everything that's going on, how confident are you that you'll still be able to meet that goal? >> well, i think that's absolutely our plan now, based on the strength of our
that in a classroom environment with just a discussion. >> that's very important dynamics. >> so game changer, shale gas, regulation, barriers, culture, skill but i will talk about the hormones. dominant, mckinsey issue is sort of the cutting edge of looking at not only global manufacturing trends, but also trains but also trains in which are described as advanced industry. and this interesting interplay of production innovation. how do you see the landscape? >> very much with what you said at the beginning, the context of what transit is a, i think it is a shift going on. i think maybe we should start by saying too many of us, love manufacturing into one big category. there are at least five categories. i won't bore you with our views. i think the tip of it is advanced manufacturing, which is more using the data advanced materials, its nanotechnology. it's the combination of many other things, the innovation, the capabilities that this country is superbly good, the cross-cultural capability and as you said, it only is roughly around 11-12% of gdp, but it's extremely important flywheel. it accounts
. there is a market for a luxury car. very comfortable. it also has the added effect of being good for the environment. jeff: this not only has the electric propulsion system, but it has a generator onboard. >> you get to a certain point, the generator will kick in and recharge the battery. you can go for hundreds of miles. jeff: you see all of these folks interested. the concept is electric cadillac. it is pretty exciting to a lot of people. >> there is nobody in the luxury space that can do this right now. we will only make so many for so long. it will be on market in january. jeff: nice. bob ferguson. spent a lot of time in washington. you did a pretty good job. everyone seems to be happy. >> it was tough going for a while, but things are good now. jeff: congratulations on the car. always good to be excited about a new product. this has gm headed in the right direction. next our, pw. dagen: you'll be at the detroit auto show. thank you so much. lance armstrong opening up about doping to oprah. we have reports that the justice department is likely to join a whistleblower lawsuit filed by former team
a environment in i we can take care of the disputes we have on the dialogue table rather than through military statements and through military actions. >> rose: its president's last press conference of his first term, and the foreign minister of pakistan when we continue. funding for charlie rose was provided by the following:. >> s. >> from our studios in new york city this is charl captioning sponsored by rose communications >> rose: tonight we begin with news from the white house, president obama held the last press conference of his first term this morning. most foft cuss was on the battle over the nation's debt limit. the president warned in his opening are remarks that the failure to raise the debt sealing would threaten the u.s. economy. >> so we got to pay our bill its. and republicans in congress have two choices here. they can act responsibly and pay america's bills, or they can act irresponsibly and put america through another economic crisis. but they will not collect a ransom in exchange for not crashing the american economy. the financial well-being of the american people is not
, in a safe way, in a way that helps the environment, in a way that helps the economy and the local community and all of the above. but we've been an entitlement -- in entitlement processes around the country that have taken over 20 years. so if you think about projects -- and we're in one right now that i won't name exactly where it is, but it's been over 20 years. we have a project down in tampa, florida, that took us 21 years to open. so it's now the most successful shopping center in that region. it's created at least 3-4,000 permanent jobs. a huge spin-off and a huge catalyst for all kinds of growth. but why should it take us 21 years to do something that's really good? and i think that's the problem. you know, regulation is necessary, but regulation has to have its place. there has to be a balance. and, you know, sort of determining the size of government, a lot of people have said, it should be the people's will, but it doesn't feel that way. and bigger is not always better. and, you know, the idea of a faster and smarter government, you know, i said earlier is really sort of like an o
client grew up in an abusive environment. >>> vice president joe biden turned in his recommendations for new gun control measures today after he met with the gun control task force. some of the considerations are tighter back ground checks, ban on assault weapons. the president offered an update. >> my starting point is not to worry about the politics. my starting point is to focus on what makes sense. what works. what should we be doing to make sure our children are safe. and we are reducing gun violence. >> this debate comes one month after the sandy hook elementary school massacre. president obama hopes to unveil a road map for curving gun violence in days. >> jackie spear is calling on the president to act independently of congress. >> i recommend he do by executive action because i am not confident this congress is going going to have the guts to do what is right. >> she was one of 12 democrats who met with vice president joe biden this among discuss thew prevent gun violence. she survived being shot several times during a visit to giana 30 years ago. >>> san francisco's muni pa
't forget the fax machine, printer, your keyboard, your telephone. and if you sneeze in an environment like this, you can infect everyone. >> that quickly? >> that quickly. >> reporter: so why is it so much worse this year than last? doctors say the virus appears to mutate. >> as we get one type of immunity, it will change and develop another kind of flu virus that can be easier to spread and potentially more serious. >> reporter: this mutating flu still spreading fast. tom costello, nbc news, bethesda, maryland. >> dr. tanya benenson is our chief medical officer here at nbc. tanya, you were telling me before air you have handed out about 1,000 inoculations just to our employees here in new york. you're reporting a lot of first-timers this year. but to that question, is it too late to get the inoculation? >> it's not too late. we still hear the flu is spreading. if the flu is spreading, new people are getting the flu and that could be you if you haven't had it. it's definitely not too late. it takes two weeks to kick in so the earlier the better, still can get one. >> people who hear this e
are not selling well. nothing in the pc environment is doing well. dale should go private. this will be a very big deal for them. michael dell will have to kick in his 15%. he started this company and his college rowing. people stated that he cannot do it but he did. but the old and desktops are not just as effective as they used to be. dell does get 50% of their revenue in foreign markets. >> mike zuckerberg irk this his moment to become steve jobs. what is it going to be? >> we don't know if this point to be a phone or not. this is very intriguing. the only time that we have seen marked zuckerberg irk was when his company was humiliated. ever since then he has been met. i do not mean that in a better way peppery epo >> the time is now 6:48 a.m.. it will not get a look at the weather. >> is cold and it is frosty in certain spots. as we look at the numbers currently is 28 degrees for santa rosa. novato is up to upper 20s. we do have a freeze on one morning and frost advisory. if you should protect your crops. the cold temperatures are in the protected valley's. the winter weather advisories will e
that there's a message of getting money from this environment and things going out of control, beyond her state's ability to deal with it. >> usually, of course, this is a classic problem that the insurance company has to deal with. they damaged the offender and they want a new car. but they have a profit and discipline of bad behavior. >> so to that point, whether we were police or qwest or not, making sure that congress does not do that. what do you think? >> hinkley hefty set up a process in advance. this is a classic case. we are under the heat of battle, there are bad stories and it's tough for congress to discipline itself. >> you're just trying to make sure that the money isn't wasted. but you will grow. >> well, you do. and you have to have a profit. >> the kind of control, you know it, the residents in your state are going to get this money because it's going to bypass you to get a roof or to put a new roof on the smithsonian. >> you know, absolutely. there are profits in place. billions of dollars going on immediately. and it's really then it's really about making sure that were
of the economic environment we've experienced in the last couple of years, exceptional product and a great customer experience, there's opportunity for share gain. we believe if we can see it on our terms in thaur environment, we're still going to win. >> it starts and ends with product. >> mickey really stirred the pot during the korns when he said it's unbelievable that amazon hasn't been mentioned. >> that's good. yeah. i guess jeff basel doesn't show up for these things, but he is one of the big elephants on the block, too. >> most definitely. and we know they're willing to take a loss sometimes just to gain that market share and it does seem to be worrying folks so much so that they're afraid to talk about it. >> were the abercrombie guys there? >> no. >> i want to get that guy there. >> you want to get him on the plane. you have to follow the rules, have to have the right uniform. >> what's the song they sing? >> phil collins. but a lot of other rules, too. >> you're not allowed to wear flip-flops. >> and they can only address them -- >> wear the same cologne, too. >> there has to be
's not what they get. they get dance in a totally different environment. >> reporter: the group began in a totally different environment 22 years ago with founder emilia rudolph. where did the idea come from? what was the genesis of this? >> one day clinging to a cliff in the sierra looking out at the vast view, i asked this question -- what would it be like to dance here? what would that mean? >>. >> reporter: it meant combining amelia's love of dance -- >> you open it as awe step back. >> reporter: with her then-boyfriend peter mayfield's passion for rock climbing. >> we eastern were connecting around how rock climbing and dance were very similar. >> double double, double two loops. >> reporter: for 22 years now, they have used the tools of rock climbing to scale their stages. in mexico that stage was the site of the oldest cathedral in the country. >> and stop. perfect. >> reporter: executive director thomas cavanaugh oversees the performance. safety always comes first. >> locked, two bolts -- >> reporter: after months of advance work and a week of intend rehears
it was just in a bad environment. i lasted the majority of the time without getting sick, but up until the end is when i started getting a little ill. >> let's pick it up when your ordeal began. you drive down with a friend to brownsville texas. you check in with the u.s. authorities. what do you tell the u.s. people? >> we told them we have got this hunting shot gun and we are trying to go through mexico legally what do we have to do? they gave us paperwork to set out if you declare it with this paperwork you should be fine. we mapaid a fee crossed the borr and declared the weapon and that's where a short while after that that's where things started going wrong. >> you go voluntarily to the mexican side show them the paperwork and they did what do you? >> it took them a while to figure out what they were going to do. once the certain super peer kwhoer that made the decision that i was going to go to jail came through, started doing the paperwork. they didn't let us know we were going to jail, though. they made it sound like we were going to go to a place and pay a fee. so they took us downtow
doctors want to see how her body reacts to the studio environment. >> michael finney is here now answering questions sent to us and we start with one e mail reading my mother-in-law left a will in 1987. the law firm that helped create sit no longer l and the lawyer died. what can we do about the will? >> this is a tough one. because of how much time has gone past. i don't know when your mother-in-law guide in the state of california you have 120 days to contest a will. so... if she's not within 120 days you've got something going for you f not, you're in a difficult situation. so i want you to get to probate attorney if there is enough money involved. few bucks, you'd run through it anyway. if there is a lot see if there is something maybe they can fill in the gap. >> ella asks is there anyway to trace scam e mails? >> trying to trace them is all but impossible. the federal government can go about it. and really good hackers to find it out. best thing you can do if you want to join in, most will have a%y+lç button you press telling them it's junk mail. doesn't just move it into the junk p
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